PEOPLE

Tiffany Pan

Tiffany Pan

Postdoctoral Fellow

Tiffany Pan is a postdoctoral scholar in the Department of Anthropology at UCSB. She earned a PhD in Bio-cultural Anthropology and an MPH in Epidemiology from the University of Washington. Her research interests are broadly in evolutionary tradeoffs of reproduction and immune function and their implications for health and fertility in contemporary human populations. She is currently collaborating with Cottage Health Research Institute in Santa Barbara on a project to better understand changes in immune function during pregnancy with a focus on the dynamics of microchimerism (cells that travel bidirectionally during pregnancy and can persist long-term in a genetically distinct individual). 

Carmen Hové

Carmen Hové

Graduate Student

Carmen Hové studies  human physiology from an evolutionary perspective, with special emphasis on topics relevant to medicine.

Her current research focuses on identifying and quantifying across- and within-population level variation in immune function, particularly among women in different reproductive states (e.g. pregnancy, lactation).

 

Maya Szafraniec

Maya Szafraniec

Graduate Student

Maya studies fetal-maternal conflict through the lens of comparative life history, ecology, and evolutionary theory. She uses computational biology and genomics to examine the consequences of these trade offs on proximal impacts to health and disease, as well as on larger evolutionary questions. Areas where these conflicts may occur include fetal microchimerism and placenta biology.

ALUMNI

Kenna Sherman

Kenna Sherman

Undergraduate Researcher

Kenna is passionate about behavioral neuroscience and genetics. Specifically, she is interested in mental illness and using genomics to find cures for complex diseases such as cancer. She expects to graduate in June 2021.

Sydney Collier

Sydney Collier

Undergraduate Researcher

Sydney is interested in evolution and genetics. Sh is specifically interested in how we can use genetics and evolutionary theory to find cures for medical diseases. She expects to graduate in 2020.